‘Shouting into the void’: #GiveTwitterASlogan shows what people really think about it

If Twitter is looking to rehabilitate its image, perhaps it shouldn’t look to its users for help.

Though its origins are unclear, people are using the trending hashtag #GiveTwitterASlogan to offer up their own catchphrases for the social network. Judging by the roughly 17,000 tweets using it, as measured by Topsy, people think Twitter is a time-sucking, race-baiting, over-sharing environment that’s leaving people wondering why they’re even on it. Oof.

Obviously, it’s not unusual for a goofy hashtag like this to gain organic traction, but this one gives a glimpse into what Twitter’s users think about the very service they’re using — as pressure mounts on newly-minted CEO Jack Dorsey to turn Twitter around. Shareholders have been unhappy with its performance, although today’s news that the company is axing 8 percent of its workforce has lifted the stock price.

Here are some of the critiques:

Of course there’s a terrible #brand tweet, too:

We don’t envy Jack.

Images via Shutterstock.

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