Target’s ‘OCD: Obsessive Christmas Disorder’ sweater draws criticism online

Target is facing backlash for a fashionable faux-pas over a sweater that some on social media are saying makes fun of a serious mental illness condition.

Here’s the sweater (and tweet) in question that launched the firestorm:

Uh oh! That’s not putting people into the cherry Christmas spirit because it’s trivializing people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder, which affects more than 3.3 million people in the U.S. The sweater prompted an outcry of people who said they were disgusted or joked that they were surprised that Target doesn’t sell a “North-Polar Depression” sweater, among other comments:

Still, there’s a vocal group from the opposite side that’s telling them to lighten up and it’s only a joke:

Target is holding firm, saying in a statement that it “apologizes for any discomfort” it causes but will continue to sell the sweater. Even on Twitter, Target’s guest services account is telling angry shoppers that it will pass along their concerns to the retailer’s merchandising team:

Even if Target does pull the sweater, the basic phrase is available on Zazzle and Amazon.

‘Tis the season for outrage, fa la la.

https://staging.digiday.com/?p=146206

More in Marketing

What TikTok’s e-commerce launch could mean for marketers and content creators

TikTok has officially launched its new e-commerce platform, TikTok Shop, earlier this month on August 1. Using the new e-commerce platform, brands and creators can sell products directly on the platform, potentially creating new revenue streams, and tap into the short-form video platform’s growing popularity.

‘The influencer industry can be really vile’: Confessions of an influencer marketer on the industry’s unfair hiring practices

While the influencer industry might sound exciting and like it’s full of opportunities, one marketer can vouch for the horrific scenarios that still take place behind the scenes.

Digiday+ Research: Marketers said revenue grew in the last year, with more growth expected ahead

After a tumultuous 12 months, marketers are getting a clear picture of how they really did during a time of true uncertainty. And, as it turns out, it wasn’t all that bad.